September 12, 2016

Black Lives Matter is no cure to racial division

Black Lives Matter is no cure to racial division

Black Lives Matter’s campaign of division and social separation will do nothing to improve racial equality, argues Comment Central.

In a desperate bid to grab news headlines, last week a group of nine protestors from Black Lives Matter stormed the runway of London City Airport and chained themselves together.

The protest disrupted hundreds of families travel plans and left thousands of passengers stranded. Seven of the protestors were arrested.

The campaign group claimed it was motivated to carry out the protest in order to highlight the environmental impact of air travel on the lives of black people locally and around the world. In tweets published to coincide with the demonstration Black Lives Matter explained the world’s ‘climate crisis is a racist crisis’, adding that ‘7/10 countries most affected by climate change are in sub-Saharan Africa’.

To claim that global warming and racism are connected is far-fetched. Having beef with the developed world’s perceived inaction on climate change is one thing, but to claim that it is motivated by a sense of racism is laughable.

The incoherent direction of the Black Lives Matter campaign is symptomatic of broader issues affecting the movement.

Firstly, racism isn’t the issue it once was (at least not among Anglophone countries). According to the World Values Survey, people from the United Kingdom and the United States were deemed to be among the most likely to embrace a racially diverse neighbour. The research also chimes with evidence from the US Bureau of Justice Statistics, which shows hate crimes remained stagnant between 2004 and 2012. Similarly, according to the Southern Poverty Law Centre, the number of hate groups have actually decreased in recent years.

Put simply, the research doesn’t support the argument that countries like the US and UK are seeing a rising tide of racist sentiment.

And it’s telling that of the nine protestors to participate in last week’s protest none were black, fuelling claims that the ranks of Black Lives Matter are swelled with middle-class brats with nothing better to do.

Secondly, the Black Lives Matter campaign lacks the inclusive nature of previous racial equality groups. When Martin Luther King stood before the Lincoln Memorial in the summer of 1963, he addressed a crowd of many thousands from a multitude of races and backgrounds. He emphasised a message of social inclusion and togetherness:

“In a sense we’ve come to our nation’s Capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir.

This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

But above all, it was a message of hope and optimism:

“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal.”

In contrast, the Black Lives Matter movement seems to emphasise the language of segregation and pessimism. The movements website talks of a ‘call to action for Black people’. It describes itself as a reaction to ‘the anti-Black racism that permeates our society and also, unfortunately, our movements’.

Even the name of the movement itself seems to heighten the sense of separation between black people and other races, as demonstrated by the competing slogan ‘all lives matter’. The beauty of the Civil Rights Movement in the sixties was its ability to emphasise how everybody had a stake in its ideology. Everybody stood to gain from the country delivering on its promise that ‘all men are created equal’.

Racism remains a challenge in both the UK and the US, but the leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement would do well to appreciate the enormous strides that have been taken to improve the lot of black people, while also recognising that only together can we complete the journey to racial harmony.

4.40 avg. rating (87% score) - 10 votes
Comment Central
Comment Central
Setup in 2016, Comment Central is a forum for policy debate and discussion. Editorially free-market, the site is intended to mirror the portfolios of Government, it therefore covers a broad range of topics, including commentary and analysis regarding the latest healthcare reforms, to musings about the state of play in US politics.
  • Shadow Warrior

    Hammond is continuity Brown. He is a hand-wringing lefty looking for clever wheezes to raise more tax in ways that people don’t immediately notice.

  • captainslugwash

    I predict the Budget will attempt to show the Left how caring the Tories are, and it will be funded by screwing over the working man.
    If Corp Tax comes down, I bet Divi tax will be going up.
    I would love to be wrong.

  • skynine

    We really need to look at tax credits, in particular in work tax credits that encourage people to work part time to preserve the benefits. 45% of women work part time and I would hazard a guess that tax credits are the main cause. This leads to low pay, low skill work in supermarkets and the retail sector including coffee shops. The government needs to get back to the employer paying people to do a job for economic reasons rather than to get onto the tax credit ladder. Like all government benefits it distorts the market and diverts government expenditure into non productive areas.
    The refrain that the government has cut expenditure is not true, it increases every year as more and more goes into welfare.

  • MrVeryAngry

    fat chance

  • MrSauce

    So, when wouldn’t we want a ‘budget for growth’?

  • Rob

    I note that the UK Government has just slapped on a 25% tax charge for anyone moving abroad and wishing to move out their private pension from the UK.

  • SonofBoudica

    The Remoaners will do their utmost to sabotage the Government’s negotiating position. They do not want a successful outcome; they want a failure. They want to be able to scream “Told you so!” from the rooftops.

  • EnglandLaments

    Thank goodness for Andrew Neil, the one media hack who scares the pants off the established politicians. He was spot on with Heidi Allen!

  • joshuafalken

    I had a very long, hard, studied and considered look at the hope, care and aspirations of all Europeans, before I voted to get the UK out of the toxic grasp of Brussels.

    The European Union and it’s charge of “ever closer union” has borrowed and spent its way to oblivion, whilst enslaving the working and middle classes in debt.

    The central control mantra of the unaccountable Brussels ruling elite, delivered through a mixture of socialism, globalism and corporatism is entirely responsible for the populist revolt by the millions of “Just About Managings” across Europe.

    We must remember the ultimate goal of socialists, globalists and corporatists is control, not prosperity. see https://mises.org/blog/goal-socialists-socialism-—-not-prosperity.

    Social equality and economic growth always fail under central control and fighting against the Brussels doctrine on behalf of all Europeans is why I voted for Brexit.

    Britain has a long history of helping Europeans depose tyrants and Brussels is just the latest incarnation.

    Britain is the most racially advanced and accepting society on the planet. We welcome those in need and those that can help us with open arms and a smile; that will not change.

    We are also one of the most innovative, talented and open societies in the world, which why everyone wants to live here. However, we cannot fit everyone in, so we have to have clear, balanced and fair immigration policy which is where the arguments start between the monetarists and humanists will never be reconciled.

    I thought long and hard before coming to the conclusion that leaving the EU was in the best interest of all Europeans, as Brussels is toxic and cannot be reformed from within.

    Also, I find it insulting that people who voted Remain have insufficient faith in British ingenuity, compassion and skill to get a good deal for us and see the Europe that we love get a better deal from Brussels and the reform that European people deserve. https://mishtalk.com/2017/03/29/bad-brexit-deal-better-than-no-deal-mathematical-idiocy-odds-of-no-deal/ and https://www.worldheadlines.info/2017/03/after-brexit-9-reasons-to-be-bullish-on-great-britain/

    The politics of left verses right are dead because neither have delivered the promised economic growth and social mobility for anyone, but themselves. The populists are not selfish per-se, they just want to take back control of their own destiny that left/right politicians have freely given away and/or exploited for their own ends. In my constituency, the local residents group are taking over the councils as politicians ignore voters, so Westminster should beware of the well-organised, local resident independents at the next election. This is a peoples revolution which should be shouted from the rooftops, but liberals remained deafened by the socialist, globalist and corporatist “vested interests” that have spectacularly failed us and are obediently crying foul and fake.

    There will be an initial unpalatable inflationary cost to fighting globalism and rolling back central control that few appear to have factored in, but dismantling failed left/right vested interests should eventually free libertarian socially-conservative capitalism from the shackles of TBTF corporatism to feed economic growth and social mobility.

  • agdpa

    The EU usually makes the wrong decision – on immigration, on freedom of movement, on the euro, on the Ukraine, etc. etc. Little hope it will get Brexit right.

  • brownowl

    Eh? Reference please!

  • Neil2

    Sod caring. Screw the spongers and breeders. Kill HS2. Stop all “green” subsidies. Slash “foreign aid” and walk away from the EUSSR with immediate effect.

  • Rob
  • John C

    What a confused article. It conflates surveillance by the security services with poor defences against fraud.

  • John C

    Err, it’s the UK that’s leaving the EU, not vice versa.

  • John C

    Me, now. ‘Growth’ is a manic obsession.

  • La Face Nord

    Mr Redwood – are you aware of the Biased BBC website? It’s been exposing their agenda for a long time, but I imagine you’ve been well aware of the BBC’s agenda for quite some time…

  • Contact Rvtech

    The post is great

x
Like us on Facebook: