December 3, 2016

Politics

The Institute of Art and Ideas asks whether the traditional divide between left and right is defunct, and if the political landscape is set to become dominated by a choice between open and closed politics. 

Amidst left and right populist surges, there was a small concession for progressive, centrist politics this week. In an affluent and picturesque suburb of south-west London, mayoral candidate Zac Goldsmith lost his Richmond seat to Liberal Democrat Sarah Olney. This victory comes in the wake of Tony Blair’s political renaissance, flagged by his interview with the New Statesman last week. During the interview, he expressed dismay at the current political climate. He was careful to express his dismay alongside a sense of ‘motivation’. Those dissatisfied with populism had found themselves ‘politically homeless’ and now required a strong, centrist and progressive voice to re-home them. Blair also made reference to a new political order, in which allegiance to left or right was replaced by allegiance to ‘open’ or ‘closed’. The Institute of Art and Ideas has long debated the birth of open versus closed. Have left and right become entirely populist? Is open versus closed the vehicle by which we can drive politics out of the populist death-trap and into progressive centrism? Or will left and right remain at the heart of political identity? Labour politician Jon Cruddas and Conservative MP Charlotte Leslie are joined by Chairman of the Open Data Institute Nigel Shadbolt to explore the prospect of new political landscapes. This debate was created in association with Prospect Magazine.

December 3, 2016

The future of left and right in a populist age

The Institute of Art and Ideas asks whether the traditional divide between left and right is defunct, and if the political landscape is set to become dominated by a choice between open and closed politics.
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December 2, 2016

Zac Goldsmith: A fitting end to a failed career

Many politicians briefly sparkle before being engulfed in failure, disappointment and anonymity. Zac Goldsmith is another name to add to this list, says Peter Bingle.
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November 16, 2016

Draining the Westminster swamp

Dig beneath the profane language and playground rhetoric and there are actually some things the UK can learn from President-elect Trump's 100 day plan, says Rory Broomfield.
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November 16, 2016

The cruel tyranny of global government

A common theme fuelling the successful Brexit and Trump campaigns was their ability to challenge the arrogant assumption of superior wisdom and moral right adopted by a gilded elite, says John Redwood.
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